Monday, April 09, 2018

National Library Week 2018


This week (April 8-14) the Al Harris Library is celebrating National Library Week by sponsoring a display of “Favorite Books of SWOSU Library Staff”Come and check out the variety of books that are on the "Favorite Books" display and check out the numerous other available library resources.  

First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April.  It is a time to celebrate the contributions of  our nation's libraries and librarians and to promote library use and support.  

We hope to see you at the Library soon!   


Monday, January 08, 2018

Lawmen, Outlaws, and Gunmen of the American West



 

The history of the American West includes that of the people who lived, worked, and traveled there.  Among these people were three groups which often went hand in hand.  They were the lawmen, outlaws and gamblers.

Western lawmen were in several forms.  There was the law enforcement who kept the peace inside city limits, such as Virgil Earp in Tombstone, Arizona.  More well-known was Virgil’s younger brother, Wyatt Earp, who worked in law enforcement positions in such places as Wichita, Kansas, and as a deputy sheriff in the Tombstone area.  The Federal government had its own law enforcement in the form of the U.S. Marshals Service.  One of the most famous U.S. deputy marshals was African American Bass Reeves, but other people were part of law enforcement in the West, including Judge Isaac C. Parker whose court was located at Fort Smith, Arkansas.  Judge Parker’s nickname was the “Hanging Judge” for sending at least seventy-nine people to the gallows.  While not all lawmen were honorable, more than once these men put their lives on the line to see justice done. 

Of course, the people that lawmen often pursued were the outlaws.  Perhaps the most famous outlaw was the Missourian Jesse James who with his brother, Frank James, and the James gang robbed trains and banks, as well as killing several people.  There were also Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid who rode in the Wild Bunch.  Some outlaws were women, and one of the most famous was Belle Starr whose only crimes might have been one or two cases of horse thievery.  Some lawmen were even considered outlaws, or at least came from questionable criminal backgrounds.  During his younger days, Wyatt Earp had been charged with horse stealing and possible theft of money.  If caught, outlaws faced jail time or even execution. 

The third group, the gamblers, consisted of men and women who gambled with money in hopes of making their fortune.  Some of them were indeed successful, although some probably gained and lost several fortunes during their lives.  There were all types of ways to gamble,  whether it be roulette, poker, faro, horse racing, etc.  John Henry Holiday, better known today as “Doc” Holiday, was a trained dentist who turned to gambling and became famous for backing up the Earp brothers at the famous O.K. Corral gunfight in October, 1881.  Although there were some successful gamblers, there were some who died penniless. 

If you have an interest in any or all of these groups, visit the book display located just northwest of the circulation desk in the Al Harris Library. Whether you have a personal interest or a class research project, step back in time and find out about the Old West lawmen, outlaws and gamblers.  Feel free to check out any of the books or DVDs!    

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

National Book Awards for 2017

Come and check out the 2017 National Book Awards Finalists and Winners display at the Al Harris Library!  The finalists were announced on October 4, and the 2017 winners were announced on November 15 at an awards ceremony in New York City.  The winners by category are: Fiction: Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward; Nonfiction: The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia by Masha Gessen; Young People's Literature: Far from the Tree by Robin Benway.

Sponsored by the National Book Foundation, the National Book Award winners are selected in these four categories: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People’s Literature. The Award began in 1950 when a consortium of book publishing groups sponsored the 1st annual National Book Awards Ceremony and Dinner at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. Their goal was to enhance the public's awareness of exceptional books written by fellow Americans and to increase the popularity of reading in general. If you would like to find out more about the National Book Awards, please go to http://www.nationalbook.org/.


Friday, November 17, 2017

Workshop on Tuesday, Nov. 28th at 7pm for the National Conference on Undergraduate Research 2018

Join SWOSU faculty and students for this informative workshop about the upcoming National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) being held at the University of Central Oklahoma from April 4-7, 2018.

The SWOSU NCUR workshop will be on Tuesday, Nov. 28th at 7:00PM in the Al Harris Library Instruction Room (2nd floor). The SWOSU workshop will cover
  • how to write an abstract,
  • design a research poster,
  • and present like a pro!
Why should I present at NCUR 2018?
  • It's a great opportunity to network at a national level
  • Present and promote your research passions
  • Learn about new fields
  • Explore career options
  • It's a road trip to UCO!
The deadline to submit a NCUR abstract is December 5th, 2017.

For more information contact
  • Frederic Murray: frederic.murray@swosu.edu
  • Erin Ridgeway: erin.ridgeway@swosu.edu
  • Taylor Verkler: taylor.verkler@swosu.edu

Monday, November 06, 2017

International Science Fiction

Because the stories of science fiction are set in the greatest extremes of both place and time, the genre is able to present themes and symbols common to all humanity without the trappings of any particular culture to hinder understanding.  That ability to bridge cultural gaps is one reason that science fiction attracts a diverse set of storytellers, as well as having exploded in popularity internationally in the last few decades.

A new display at the Al Harris Library highlights some of the best science fiction authors from diverse cultures and languages.

One is Octavia E. Butler, the first science-fiction writer to win the MacArthur award, who believed that her existence as an African-American woman “equipped her spectacularly well to portray life in hostile dystopias where the odds of survival can be almost insurmountable,” according her obituary in The New York Times.

 Also featured are authors from around the world, such as Cixin Liu, perhaps China’s most popular science fiction author, and Carlos Ruiz Zafón, a Spanish author who writes both young adult and adult science fiction.

Science fiction’s popularity has ensured that works such as these are translated into several languages in order to reach the international audience hungry to experience places and times that don’t exist – yet.

Monday, October 23, 2017

Workshop on Tuesday, Oct. 24 at 7pm for the National Conference on Undergraduate Research 2018

Join SWOSU faculty and students for this informative workshop about the upcoming National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) being held at the University of Central Oklahoma from April 4-7, 2018.

The SWOSU NCUR workshop will be on Tuesday, Oct. 24th at 7:00PM in the Al Harris Library Instruction Room (2nd floor). The SWOSU workshop will cover
  • how to write an abstract,
  • design a research poster,
  • and present like a pro!
Why should I present at NCUR 2018?
  • It's a great opportunity to network at a national level
  • Present and promote your research passions
  • Learn about new fields
  • Explore career options
  • It's a road trip to UCO!
The deadline to submit a NCUR abstract is December 5th, 2017.

For more information contact
  • Frederic Murray: frederic.murray@swosu.edu
  • Taylor Verkler: taylor.verkler@swosu.edu

Friday, October 13, 2017

Campus power outage south of Davis St. [Update: Power is back!]

Updated 10/13/2017, 4:10pm

Power and A/C are back in the Al Harris Library.



Original post

The Weatherford campus south of Davis St. is experiencing a power brown-out. The Al Harris Library is open and most library computers are working, but there's no air conditioning.